Day 34: Monorail Porn

We start the day by kicking up a smoked salmon scramble with fried capers. Plenty of energy for what’s to come.

I got to go into work with Kris today.


The posters for his show are six stories tall.


On the left is the main entrance, on the right, Kris stands in a training room (tightly cropped to respect the show’s secrets).

Request #1: Right, monorails! Who am I to turn down a request for a photo shoot?

Some of you are familiar with Mr. H, who wanted to know, more than anything, if I had ridden the Las Vegas Monorail. And could I please post pictures. Of course I did, and of course I will.

It’s actually hard to get a good photo of the monorail, unless you want one from underneath. Not so sexy.

I did find a place outside where I could hang out, high enough to be level with it. It’s not strictly forbidden, and there are no security cameras anyway (they’re all inside watching the money).

So here they all are, by special request.








Okay, Mr. H is right. Monorails are cool. Kris and I were thinking that they should extend this one to the airport, but it looks like that’s already planned.

Request #2: Another request I got, from a cryptographer friend, was to encrypt the secret parts instead of just blacking them out. That could get me in trouble, but what the heck, that’s not unusual.

So Mr. N/Po, here’s what I did for the rest of the day:

There’s an excellent [qsyop piydofr pg s apvsa vsmyoms] where the bartender knows how to [zslr rcvraarmy zsthstoysd] and if you’re willing to wait, [s brtu dqovu rmvjoasfs] with three different extremely hot [dsivrd]. After the first one, when I asked [gpt dpzr arzpmsfr, jr dsof jr fofm’y aolr yjr dyigg om yjr dpfs] gun at all, so [jr zsfr dpzr gtpz gtrdjau] squeezed [arzpmd, ejovj esd qrtgrvy, smf mpy ypp] sweet.


The pole-dancing [vsdomp od vapdrf imyoa momr, dp O qasurf dpzr nasvlksvl mrstnu].

…It’s all true, and I was even in perfect time to catch my flight home.

…and my beautiful muse picked me up at the airport in SF, and made me an offer I couldn’t refuse: dinner at Incanto. Oh yum.

Whew, that’s enough for one day. (It’s kind of enough for three days, really.)

Random assertion: Many things which are not encouraged are also not technically forbidden.

Steganographic data: 1888/6.4

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Published in: on June 20, 2008 at 11:15 am  Comments (5)  
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Day 4: The Biggest Logic Puzzle Ever

Ben & Jerry’s in Berkeley on the west side of campus gives free WiFi access with any purchase. I like to think of it the other way around, as $3 WiFi access which comes with a big free cone of chocolate ice cream.

…so I sat in the ice cream shop with a Skype headset and called the muse in Hong Kong. Her “assignment” goes well, and after a quick change from brunette to redhead (with a new passport to match), she’s off to Taipei today before anyone notices the diamonds are missing. I get her back in 2.7 days, and I can’t wait.

(I tried to keep this post super-short, honest. I failed again.)

If you enjoy mind-bending puzzles, I recommend this book by Julian Brown as an intro to Quantum Computation. It’s written for interested readers, not math geeks.

In January 2000, my casual interest in this subject “clicked over” without warning, and became a hobby (in this case, the line between “hobby” and “obsession” is not well-defined).

Here’s why QC is cool:

On the U.C. Berkeley campus…

..in what’s called the Hearst Mining Building, on the very top floor (see the door up there?)…

…is what some people would call a nice bright attic with a comfy lounge and a small kitchen.

This, and the offices and computers and people and ideas it contains, is Berkeley Quantum Information & Computation Center (BQIC). In May of 2004, I skipped out of work for a few hours to attend the ribbon-cutting and dedication of this facility.

BQIC is another one of those places you won’t see unless you’re looking for it.

Today at BQIC, there’s a guest lecturer. Dr. John Yard from Los Alamos National Laboratory came to give a seminar on his recent work. By “recent”, I mean that he was presenting stuff he literally just finished last week, and it hasn’t even been published yet. There were about ten of us in the audience, which was awesome.

There’s a lot of the presentation I couldn’t keep up with (I just relax and write it down so I can stare at it later until it means something), but the conclusion is a shocker.

Here’s the gist: Imagine you’re trying to send a coded message to someone, but your transmitters don’t work at all, so the amount of information they can transmit is actually zero. By combining a few of the transmitters, you can create a code which allows the information to be transmitted anyway, and even keep it secure. (That’s a poor summary, but there it is.)

Afterward, I went to Christine and Shannon’s place. Once in a while, they invite a bunch of inventor-types and business-types to their place for an awesome dinner. It’s sort of like setting up a heap of kindling and then banging rocks together to make sparks.

Random assertion: If you think you’ve missed the golden age of invention and discovery, that it’s all been done and found, remember that your parents and grandparents thought the same thing, when they were your age.

Steganographic data: 1870/5.9