Day 4: The Biggest Logic Puzzle Ever

Ben & Jerry’s in Berkeley on the west side of campus gives free WiFi access with any purchase. I like to think of it the other way around, as $3 WiFi access which comes with a big free cone of chocolate ice cream.

…so I sat in the ice cream shop with a Skype headset and called the muse in Hong Kong. Her “assignment” goes well, and after a quick change from brunette to redhead (with a new passport to match), she’s off to Taipei today before anyone notices the diamonds are missing. I get her back in 2.7 days, and I can’t wait.

(I tried to keep this post super-short, honest. I failed again.)

If you enjoy mind-bending puzzles, I recommend this book by Julian Brown as an intro to Quantum Computation. It’s written for interested readers, not math geeks.

In January 2000, my casual interest in this subject “clicked over” without warning, and became a hobby (in this case, the line between “hobby” and “obsession” is not well-defined).

Here’s why QC is cool:

On the U.C. Berkeley campus…

..in what’s called the Hearst Mining Building, on the very top floor (see the door up there?)…

…is what some people would call a nice bright attic with a comfy lounge and a small kitchen.

This, and the offices and computers and people and ideas it contains, is Berkeley Quantum Information & Computation Center (BQIC). In May of 2004, I skipped out of work for a few hours to attend the ribbon-cutting and dedication of this facility.

BQIC is another one of those places you won’t see unless you’re looking for it.

Today at BQIC, there’s a guest lecturer. Dr. John Yard from Los Alamos National Laboratory came to give a seminar on his recent work. By “recent”, I mean that he was presenting stuff he literally just finished last week, and it hasn’t even been published yet. There were about ten of us in the audience, which was awesome.

There’s a lot of the presentation I couldn’t keep up with (I just relax and write it down so I can stare at it later until it means something), but the conclusion is a shocker.

Here’s the gist: Imagine you’re trying to send a coded message to someone, but your transmitters don’t work at all, so the amount of information they can transmit is actually zero. By combining a few of the transmitters, you can create a code which allows the information to be transmitted anyway, and even keep it secure. (That’s a poor summary, but there it is.)

Afterward, I went to Christine and Shannon’s place. Once in a while, they invite a bunch of inventor-types and business-types to their place for an awesome dinner. It’s sort of like setting up a heap of kindling and then banging rocks together to make sparks.

Random assertion: If you think you’ve missed the golden age of invention and discovery, that it’s all been done and found, remember that your parents and grandparents thought the same thing, when they were your age.

Steganographic data: 1870/5.9

Day 2: Hats, Whips and Oysters

Morning: Hats & Whips First thing in the morning, I went to a screening of our company’s new movie. When the theater is full of your friends watching their hard work on the big screen, cheering out loud comes naturally.

The morning muni train on the way to the movie was packed. People in Batman costumes, fishnet stockings, and what looked like Dr. Seuss brand headwear. Hooray for Bay to Breakers. The world is truly a good place.

Afternoon: Music & Food After the movie, I wandered over to the SF OysterFest and had some tasty bivalves. When I got there, some crazed girl jumped on my back and I couldn’t shake her off. That’d be Katy:

We’ve been good friends since about age 10.

Night: Home cookin’ Afterward, Shannon and Christine took me in for dinner. My contribution was some really good burrata. (Christine’s a fantastic cook, and Shannon and I have much to discuss, always.)

Random Assertion: I’m pretty sure that if you translate birdsong into human language you’ll learn new swear words. If you watch them sing, you can totally tell that’s what’s up. (Puns about fowl language will not be tolerated.)
Lessons learned: Sunblock only works if you wear it. Short blog entries are much quicker to write than long ones.

Steganographic data: 1922/2.0